THINK YOU CAN ANSWER GOOGLE’S NOW BANNED INTERVIEW QUESTIONS…..

Google has been notorious in the past for some pretty wild hiring techniques. At one point they wouldn’t even consider applicants unless they had attended an ivy league school such as MIT, Harvard, Yale, Cal Tech or Stanford. They went even further in questioning experts already in their 30’s about their college GPA’s which has to be pretty aggravating for someone who has proven themselves in a certain industry.

To make matters even worse for these ivy league would be Googlers. Google went ahead and subjected them to some pretty crazy interview questions that would make anyone feel stupid. Not entirely due to their difficulty, but the vagueness and random nature of their questions.

Get ready to have your brain wrecked; We’re counting down the most outrageous interview questions that have now been banned by Google.

#1. How Many Golf Balls Would Fit Into A School Bus

insanely hard banned google interview questions

  • Guest

    The question States that you are using a balance only two times. First you pick any six balls and put three and three on opposite sides of the balance. This is the first weighing. If both groups of balls weigh the same, then none of the six are the heavier ball. For the second weighing, you are only weighing the last two balls, one of which will be the heavier ball. If in the first weighing one group of balls is heavier, it will be known that the heavier ball will be one of the three, thus you will have eliminated five balls. For the second weighing, just choose any two of the three balls remaining and compare weights. If one is heavier you know which one it is. If the the two weigh the same, then you know the remaining ball is the heavier ball. Done.

  • Jose Cruz-Mena

    It states that you will use a balance only two times. For the first weighing, you take three balls and place them on one end of the balance and another three on the other end, leaving two balls aside. If both sides weight the same, you can assume that the heavier ball is one of the two left aside. Then for the second weighing you just weigh the last two balls to get the answer. If in the first weighing one side is heavier, you can assume that the heavier ball is one of the three balls on the heavier side of the balance. Then for the second weighing you just pick any two of the three balls and weigh them, leaving one ball aside. If one is heavier, you have your answer. If they both weigh the same, then the remaining ball is the heavier ball.